May Word Count Madness (Plotting and Planning)

Okay, So I want to apologize for not updating sooner, but I was caught in the midst of a whirlwind of creative mojo.  In the first five days of May, 2012, I wrote just under 10,000 words, while working full time, not taking any days off work.  I was absolutely blown away by how much I got written, and I am extremely happy with it.  Not only did I write some final text that’s going to end up in the novels, but I planned out two potential new series and did a great deal of plotting for Red Lands Book 3.

In the intervening days, my writing has slowed, but I’m still more than meeting my 250 words/day goal, even not averaging in that amazingly productive first week.

As you may know, my writing process doesn’t involve a lot of rewriting (unless I absolutely have to, I only edit, not rewrite.  I fix errors, whether typographical, factual, or plot-based, but I don’t go in an polish all the originality out of my prose.  I’ve done that in the past, and it created a dry, soulless style that even my own family members couldn’t stomach … and if you think reading it was bad, trying writing it), nor does my writing style include a lot of formal outlining.

What I tend to do is get somewhat inspired about an idea or topic and write a large number of notes, typing as quickly as my clumsy fingers can fly, including dialog snippets, occasional full scenes, descriptions, plans for the long term, etc.  I’d say better than half of these ideas die off in the development stage, because they don’t have enough complexity and depth to really engage me (and if I’m bored or unhappy when writing something, the reader will be too).

Somewhere in the developmental phase I tend to write two ‘plot summaries,’ one based on Algis Budrys’ seven parts of a story, the other based on Don Miller’s definition of a story as “someone who wants something and overcomes obstacles to get it.”  Between the two, they keep me focused on maintaining a solid, flowing narrative, with an active main character (one that things don’t just happen to, but who makes things happen), with solid motivations, who overcomes hardships and even makes sacrifices in order to get what he (or she) wants.

How far they’ll go, and how much they’ll risk or give up, is often what makes the story worth reading.  Or writing, for that matter.

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